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Bulat Tretyakov
Bulat Tretyakov

When You Buy A Car From A Dealer


You should also research the make and model you're interested in purchasing before you visit the dealer. This will help you understand the different features available, the price range, and other information that will help you to make the best decision for your circumstance.




when you buy a car from a dealer


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But many Americans make big mistakes buying cars. Take new car purchases with a trade-in. A third of buyers roll over an average of $5,000 in debt from their last car into their new loan. They're paying for a car they don't drive anymore. Ouch! That is not a winning personal finance strategy.


"The single best advice I can give to people is to get preapproved for a car loan from your bank, a credit union or an online lender," says Philip Reed. He's the autos editor at the personal finance site NerdWallet. He also worked undercover at an auto dealership to learn the secrets of the business when he worked for the car-buying site Edmunds.com. So Reed is going to pull back the curtain on the car-buying game.


For one thing, he says, getting a loan from a lender outside the car dealership prompts buyers to think about a crucial question. "How much car can I afford? You want to do that before a salesperson has you falling in love with the limited model with the sunroof and leather seats. "


Van Alst says many people don't realize it, but the dealership is allowed to jack up the rate it offers you above what you actually qualify for. So with your credit score, "you might qualify for an interest rate of 6%," says Van Alst. But, he says, the dealership might not tell you that and offer you a 9% rate. If you take that bad deal, you could pay thousands of dollars more in interest. Van Alst says the dealership and its finance company, "they'll split that extra money."


So Reed says having that preapproval can be a valuable card to have in your hand in the car-buying game. It can help you negotiate a better rate. "The preapproval will act as a bargaining chip," he says. "If you're preapproved at 4.5%, the dealer says, 'Hey, you know, I can get you 3.5. Would you be interested?' And it's a good idea to take it, but make sure all of the terms, meaning the down payment and the length of the loan, remain the same."


So at the dealership, Reed and Van Alst both say, the first step is to start with the price of the vehicle you are buying. The salesperson at the dealership will often want to know if you're planning to trade in another car and whether you're also looking to get a loan through the dealership. Reed says don't answer those questions! That makes the game too complicated, and you're playing against pros. If you negotiate a really good purchase price on the car, they might jack up the interest rate to make extra money on you that way or lowball you on your trade-in. They can juggle all those factors in their head at once. You don't want to. Keep it simple. One thing at a time.


Once you settle on a price, then you can talk about a trade-in if you have one. But Reed and Van Alst say to do your homework there too. A little research online can tell you what your trade is worth in ballpark terms. Reed suggests looking at the free pricing guides at Edmunds.com, Kelley Blue Book and NADA. On Autotrader, you can also see what people in your area are asking for your car model. And he says, "You can get an actual offer from Carvana.com and also by taking the car to a CarMax, where they will write you a check on the spot."


So he and Van Alst say don't be afraid to walk away or buy the car at a good price without the trade-in if you feel the dealership is lowballing you on your old car. You have plenty of other good options these days.


"You're led to this back office. They'll often refer to it as the box," says Van Alst. This is where the dealership will try to sell you extended warranties, tire protection plans, paint protection plans, something called gap insurance. Dealerships make a lot of money on this stuff. And Van Alst says it's often very overpriced and most people have no idea how to figure out a fair price.


"Concerning the extended factory warranty, you can always buy it later," says Reed. "So if you're buying a new car, you can buy it in three years from now, just before it goes out of warranty." At that point, if you want the extended warranty, he says, you should call several dealerships and ask for the best price each can offer. That way, he says, you're not rolling the cost into your car loan and paying interest on a service you wouldn't even use for three years because you're still covered by the new car's warranty.


Gap insurance promises to cover any gap between the purchase price of replacing your almost-new car with a brand-new car if your regular insurance doesn't pay for full replacement if your car gets totaled. Van Alst says gap insurance is often overpriced and is fundamentally problematic. If you still want the product, it's best to obtain it through your regular insurance company, not the dealer.


Reed says a colleague at NerdWallet actually bought a minivan recently and "when she got home, she looked at the contract." She had asked for a five-year loan but said the dealership instead stuck her with a seven-year loan. "And they included a factory warranty which she didn't request and she didn't want." Reed says she was able to cancel the entire contract, remove the extended warranty and get a rebate on it.


"But the point of it is," he says, "I mean, here's somebody who is very financially savvy, and yet they were able to do this to her. And it's not an uncommon scenario for people to think that they've got a good deal, but then when they go home and look at the contract, they find out what's been done to them."


NPR has a personal finance Facebook group called Your Money and Your Life. And we asked group members about car buying. Many said they were shocked by how much money some other people in the group said they were spending on cars. Patricia and Dean Raeker from Minneapolis wrote, "40 years of owning vehicles and our total transportation purchases don't even add up to the cost of one of the financed ones these folks are talking about."


If your gas-powered vehicle is more than 4 years old, the dealer you are buying from must get a smog certification before selling to you, unless the vehicle was smog certified within the last 90 days.


The DMV chatbot and live chat services use third-party vendors to provide machine translation. Machine translation is provided for purposes of information and convenience only. The DMV is unable to guarantee the accuracy of any translation provided by the third-party vendors and is therefore not liable for any inaccurate information or changes in the formatting of the content resulting from the use of the translation service.


When you buy a used vehicle, the dealer must certify, in writing, that it is "in condition and repair to render, under normal use, satisfactory and adequate service upon the public highway at the time of delivery." The dealer certification covers the entire vehicle except items that would be obvious to the customer before the sale, such as torn upholstery, missing hubcaps, etc. The vehicle also must have all safety equipment and emissions controls required by state and federal laws for the vehicle's model year.


If a lien is being recorded or the dealer issued number plates, the dealer MUST handle the registration for you. The dealer may charge you up to $175 for this service, plus the actual fees for the vehicle's Certificate of Title (MV-999), registration, and license plates. As a customer courtesy, a registered dealer may submit your completed Vehicle Registration/Title Application (MV-82) to the DMV. The dealer also may provide a temporary certificate of registration and, if needed, new license plates.


If a vehicle has been rebuilt, originally not manufactured to U.S. standards, or reconstructed, a branding notice must be printed in capital letters on the front of the New York State title certificate. A dealer must inform a customer, in writing, if a branded vehicle is being shown or sold to a retail customer. This may be a notice placed on the dealer's bill of sale or handed to the customer.


You can also find a printed notice on the front of the title certificate if a vehicle previously had been returned to the manufacturer, its agent, or dealer because it did not conform to warranty. It also will be printed on the title after a final determination of a court finding or settlement under the state's Lemon Law. This notice will read:


A vehicle with this label has been repaired or constructed with a glider kit, but not one manufactured in two or more stages. A glider kit includes all components of a vehicle except the power train. It is generally used to rebuild heavy trucks or tractors that have been extensively damaged. Passenger cars built from custom kits are not considered reconstructed vehicles.


Vehicle price is not controlled by any government agency. Take time to choose a vehicle that meets your needs and budget. Before you buy a vehicle, compare prices by checking newspaper ads and visit a number of dealers and/or private sellers. Then take it for a test drive. If you are knowledgeable, examine the engine, transmission, drive axles, steering and suspension, brakes and electrical system. If you do not know what to look for, it may be wise to pay a professional automotive technician to examine the vehicle.


Before you buy from a dealer, find out about dealer or manufacturer warranties, what they cover, and for how long. Ask if the dealer performs service or subcontracts to a repair shop. Be sure all agreements, guarantees and warranties are in writing.


For a used vehicle purchased from a New York State registered dealer - the proof of ownership is the Certificate of Title (MV-999), or a transferable registration for 1972 and older models, signed over to the dealer, and the dealer's Certificate of Sale (MV-50) showing ownership transfer to you. The dealer must complete, and you must acknowledge by signing, the appropriate odometer and damage disclosure statements. 041b061a72


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